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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 6824581, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6824581
Research Article

Health Orientation, Knowledge, and Attitudes toward Genetic Testing and Personalized Genomic Services: Preliminary Data from an Italian Sample

1Interdisciplinary Research Center on Decision Making Processes (IRIDe), Department of Oncology and Hemato-Oncology (DIPO), University of Milan, Via Festa del Perdono 7, 20122 Milan, Italy
2Applied Research Division for Cognitive and Psychological Science, Istituto Europeo di Oncologia (IEO), Via Ripamonti 435, 20141 Milan, Italy

Received 1 September 2016; Revised 14 November 2016; Accepted 12 December 2016

Academic Editor: Joseph Telfair

Copyright © 2016 Serena Oliveri et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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