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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 7053867, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7053867
Research Article

Role of the Frontal Cortex in Standing Postural Sway Tasks While Dual-Tasking: A Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study Examining Working Memory Capacity

1Department of Neurorehabilitation, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Kio University, 4-2-2 Umami-naka, Koryo-cho, Kitakatsuragi-gun, Nara 635-0832, Japan
2Department of Physical Therapy, Osaka Yukioka College of Health Science, Osaka, Japan
3Neurorehabilitation Research Center, Kio University, Nara 635-0832, Japan

Received 11 August 2015; Revised 31 December 2015; Accepted 11 January 2016

Academic Editor: Antonino Vallesi

Copyright © 2016 Hiroyuki Fujita et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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