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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 7098987, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7098987
Research Article

Embryoid Body-Explant Outgrowth Cultivation from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in an Automated Closed Platform

1Department of Reproductive Biology, National Research Institute for Child Health and Development, Tokyo 157-8535, Japan
2Medical Devices Division, Kaneka Corporation, Osaka 530-8288, Japan
3Laboratory for Medical Engineering, Division of Materials and Chemical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Yokohama National University, Kanagawa 240-8501, Japan
4Medical Device Development Laboratories, Kaneka Corporation, Hyōgo 676-8688, Japan
5Division of Carcinogenesis and Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Tokyo 104-0045, Japan
6Research Team for Geriatric Medicine (Vascular Medicine), Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Tokyo 173-0015, Japan

Received 12 December 2015; Revised 3 June 2016; Accepted 19 June 2016

Academic Editor: Koichiro Wada

Copyright © 2016 Hiroshi Tone et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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