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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 7367485, 11 pages
Review Article

Circulating Resistin Levels and Risk of Colorectal Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

1Department of Clinical Laboratory, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071, China
2Department of Center for Gene Diagnosis, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071, China
3Department of Pathology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071, China

Received 10 May 2016; Accepted 20 July 2016

Academic Editor: Oreste Gualillo

Copyright © 2016 Gui Yang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Objectives. Published data on resistin levels in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) were conflicting and heterogeneous. We conducted a meta-analysis of observational studies to examine the association of circulating resistin levels with carcinogenesis of the CRC. Methods. Potentially eligible studies published up to November 2015 were searched through MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded database, CNKI, and WanFang database. The pooled weighted mean differences (WMDs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) calculated by fixed- or random-effect model were used to estimate the effects. Results. A total of 11 studies involving 965 patients were admitted in our meta-analysis. The pooled effects indicated that resistin levels were higher in CRC patients compared to healthy controls (WMD: 1.47 ng/mL; 95% CI: 0.78 to 2.16), with significant heterogeneity across the studies (%, ). Subgroup analyses and sensitivity analyses revealed that study quality, design, sample type, and resistin assays may account for this heterogeneity. No publication bias was observed. Conclusions. Our meta-analysis suggests that increased circulating resistin levels are associated with greater risk of colorectal cancer. Given the limited number of available studies and significant heterogeneity, larger well-designed randomized studies are warranted.