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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 7827615, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7827615
Research Article

VOCs-Mediated Location of Olive Fly Larvae by the Braconid Parasitoid Psyttalia concolor: A Multivariate Comparison among VOC Bouquets from Three Olive Cultivars

1Department of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Pisa, Via del Borghetto 80, 56124 Pisa, Italy
2Interdepartmental Research Center Nutrafood “Nutraceuticals and Food for Health”, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy
3Department of Pharmacy, University of Pisa, Via Bonanno 6, 56126 Pisa, Italy

Received 1 October 2015; Revised 11 January 2016; Accepted 13 January 2016

Academic Editor: Heather Simpson

Copyright © 2016 Giulia Giunti et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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