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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 7867852, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7867852
Research Article

Advanced Glycation End Products Induce Obesity and Hepatosteatosis in CD-1 Wild-Type Mice

1Digestive Diseases, Hepatology and Nutrition Center, Connecticut Children’s Medical Center, Hartford, CT 06106, USA
2University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington, CT 06032, USA
3Department of Anesthesiology, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14214, USA
4Veterans Administration Western New York Healthcare System, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14215, USA
5Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14214, USA
6Department of Surgery, University at Buffalo-SUNY School of Medicine, Buffalo, NY 14214, USA
7Departments of Pathology and Anatomical Sciences, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Buffalo, NY 14228, USA
8Department of Rehabilitation Science, University at Buffalo-SUNY School of Medicine, Buffalo, NY 14214, USA
9Department of Pediatric Pathology, Women & Children’s Hospital of Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14203, USA
10Digestive Diseases and Nutrition Center, Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Women & Children’s Hospital of Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14222, USA

Received 1 December 2015; Accepted 10 January 2016

Academic Editor: Yanwen Wang

Copyright © 2016 Wael N. Sayej et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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