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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 8218439, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8218439
Research Article

Formation of Aldehydic Phosphatidylcholines during the Anaerobic Decomposition of a Phosphatidylcholine Bearing the 9-Hydroperoxide of Linoleic Acid

Department of Food Science and Technology, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, P.O. Box 62000, Nairobi 00200, Kenya

Received 1 March 2016; Revised 27 April 2016; Accepted 10 May 2016

Academic Editor: Ying-Mei Zhang

Copyright © 2016 Arnold N. Onyango. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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