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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 8243145, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8243145
Review Article

Alice in Wonderland Syndrome: A Clinical and Pathophysiological Review

1Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy
2Department of Anatomy, Histology, Forensic Medicine and Orthopaedics, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy
3University Consortium for Adaptive Disorders and Head Pain (UCADH), Pavia, Italy

Received 13 June 2016; Accepted 20 November 2016

Academic Editor: Oliver von Bohlen und Halbach

Copyright © 2016 Giulio Mastria et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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