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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 8391589, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8391589
Research Article

TBS Predict Coronary Artery Calcification in Adults

1Department of Nuclear Medicine, Dalin Tzu Chi Hospital, Buddhist Tzu Chi Medical Foundation, Chiayi 62247, Taiwan
2Department of Medical Imaging, Dalin Tzu Chi Hospital, Buddhist Tzu Chi Medical Foundation, Chiayi 62247, Taiwan
3Department of Cardiology, Dalin Tzu Chi Hospital, Buddhist Tzu Chi Medical Foundation, Chiayi 62247, Taiwan
4School of Medicine, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan

Received 23 January 2016; Accepted 10 February 2016

Academic Editor: Raffaele Serra

Copyright © 2016 Tzyy-Ling Chuang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Purpose. This study analyzes the association between the bony microarchitecture score (trabecular bone score, TBS) and coronary artery calcification (CAC) in adults undergoing health exams. Materials and Methods. We retrospectively collected subjects () who underwent coronary computed tomography and bone mineral density studies simultaneously. CAC was categorized to three levels (Group 0, G0, no CAC, score = 0, ; Group 1, G1, moderate CAC, score = 1–100, ; Group 2, G2, high CAC, score 101, ). Multinomial logistic regression was used to study the association between TBS and CAC levels. Results. CAC is present in 44.4% of the population. Mean TBS ± SD was . Per 1 SD increase in TBS, the unadjusted odds ratio (2.393) of moderate CAC compared with no CAC was significantly increased (95% CI, 1.219–4.696, ). However, there has been no association of TBS with high CAC (OR: 1.026, 95% CI: 0.586–1.797, ). These relationships also existed when individually adjusted for age, sex, and multiple other covariates. Conclusions. Higher TBS was related to moderate CAC, but not high CAC; a possible explanation may be that bone microarchitecture remodeling becomes more active when early coronary artery calcification occurs. However, further researches are needed to clarify this pathophysiology.