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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 8758460, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8758460
Research Article

Ultrastructural Mapping of the Zebrafish Gastrointestinal System as a Basis for Experimental Drug Studies

1School of Medical Sciences (Discipline of Anatomy and Histology), The Bosch Institute, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
2Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia
3Australian Centre for Microscopy & Microanalysis (ACMM), The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
4Charles Perkins Centre, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia

Received 17 March 2016; Accepted 4 May 2016

Academic Editor: Minjun Chen

Copyright © 2016 Delfine Cheng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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