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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 9132840, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9132840
Research Article

Design of Infusion Schemes for Neuroreceptor Imaging: Application to [11C]Flumazenil-PET Steady-State Study

1Neurobiology Research Unit, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark
2PET and Cyclotron Unit, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark
3Heart Centre, Aarhus University Hospital, Noerrebrogade 44, 8000 Aarhus, Denmark
4Faculty of Health and Medicine Sciences, Copenhagen University, Blegdamsvej 3, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark
5Danish Research Centre Magnetic Resonance, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre Hospital, Kettegaard Allé 30, 2650 Hvidovre, Denmark
6Epilepsy Clinic, Department of Neurology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark

Received 4 January 2016; Accepted 13 March 2016

Academic Editor: Olaf Prante

Copyright © 2016 Ling Feng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

This study aims at developing a simulation system that predicts the optimal study design for attaining tracer steady-state conditions in brain and blood rapidly. Tracer kinetics was determined from bolus studies and used to construct the system. Subsequently, the system was used to design inputs for bolus infusion (BI) or programmed infusion (PI) experiments. Steady-state quantitative measurements can be made with one short scan and venous blood samples. The receptor ligand []Flumazenil (FMZ) was chosen for this purpose, as it lacks a suitable reference region. Methods. Five bolus []FMZ-PET scans were conducted, based on which population-based PI and BI schemes were designed and tested in five additional healthy subjects. The design of a PI was assisted by an offline feedback controller. Results. The system could reproduce the measurements in blood and brain. With PI, []FMZ steady state was attained within 40 min, which was 8 min earlier than the optimal BI (B/I ratio = 55 min). Conclusions. The system can design both BI and PI schemes to attain steady state rapidly. For example, subjects can be []FMZ-PET scanned after 40 min of tracer infusion for 40 min with venous sampling and a straight-forward quantification. This simulation toolbox is available for other PET-tracers.