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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 9471478, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9471478
Research Article

Seawater Immersion Aggravates Burn Injury Causing Severe Blood Coagulation Dysfunction

Department of Anesthesia, Daping Hospital and Research Institute of Field Surgery, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400042, China

Received 16 July 2015; Revised 6 December 2015; Accepted 10 December 2015

Academic Editor: Saulius Butenas

Copyright © 2016 Hong Yan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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