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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 9582430, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9582430
Review Article

Macrophages and Their Role in Atherosclerosis: Pathophysiology and Transcriptome Analysis

1Institute of General Pathology and Pathophysiology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow 125315, Russia
2Faculty of Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, University of New South Wales, Kensington, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
3School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Campbelltown, NSW 2560, Australia
4Department of Development and Regeneration, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
5Department of Molecular Genetic Diagnostics and Cell Biology, Institute of Pediatrics, Research Center for Children’s Health, Moscow 119991, Russia
6Institute for Atherosclerosis, Skolkovo Innovation Center, Moscow 143025, Russia
7Department of Biophysics, Biological Faculty, Moscow State University, Moscow 119991, Russia

Received 29 March 2016; Revised 29 May 2016; Accepted 22 June 2016

Academic Editor: Tomasz Guzik

Copyright © 2016 Yuri V. Bobryshev et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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