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BioMed Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 9705287, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9705287
Clinical Study

High Intensity Resistance Training Methods with and without Protein Supplementation to Fight Cardiometabolic Risk in Middle-Aged Males: A Randomized Controlled Trial

1Institute of Medical Physics, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Henkestrasse 91, 91052 Erlangen, Germany
2Department of Sports Science, University of Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schrödinger-Straße, 67663 Kaiserslautern, Germany

Received 24 October 2015; Revised 17 December 2015; Accepted 20 December 2015

Academic Editor: Danilo S. Bocalini

Copyright © 2016 Wolfgang Kemmler et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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