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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 1047523, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1047523
Research Article

Exploring the Urtica dioica Leaves Hemostatic and Wound-Healing Potential

1Laboratory of Biopesticides, Center of Biotechnology of Sfax, University of Sfax, P.O. Box 1177, 3018 Sfax, Tunisia
2Laboratory of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine of Sfax, Road Majida Boulila, 3028 Sfax, Tunisia
3Laboratory of Histopathology, Faculty of Medicine of Sfax, Road Majida Boulila, 3028 Sfax, Tunisia

Correspondence should be addressed to Karama Zouari Bouassida

Received 19 June 2017; Accepted 12 September 2017; Published 17 October 2017

Academic Editor: Dong-Wook Han

Copyright © 2017 Karama Zouari Bouassida et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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