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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 1762162, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1762162
Research Article

Multilocus Sequencing of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Biotype Ovis Strains

1CAR, HAS, Institute for Veterinary Medical Research, P.O. Box 18, Budapest 1581, Hungary
2Government Office for Borsod-Abaúj-Zemplén County, Vologda U. 1, Miskolc 3525, Hungary
3Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, University of Veterinary Medicine, P.O. Box 22, Budapest 1581, Hungary

Correspondence should be addressed to László Makrai; uh.tevinu@olzsal.iarkam

Received 4 March 2017; Revised 26 July 2017; Accepted 8 August 2017; Published 11 October 2017

Academic Editor: Chiu-Chung Young

Copyright © 2017 Boglárka Sellyei et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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