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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 1829685, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1829685
Research Article

RNA-Based Stable Isotope Probing Suggests Allobaculum spp. as Particularly Active Glucose Assimilators in a Complex Murine Microbiota Cultured In Vitro

1Institute of Precision Medicine, Faculty of Medical & Life Sciences, Furtwangen University, 78054 Villingen-Schwenningen, Germany
2AgResearch Ltd, Grasslands Research Centre, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand
3The New Zealand Institute for Plant & Food Research Ltd, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand
4Institute of Microbiology and Biotechnology, University of Ulm, 89069 Ulm, Germany
5Department of Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology, 35043 Marburg, Germany

Correspondence should be addressed to Markus Egert; ed.negnawtruf-sh@trege.sukram

Received 14 November 2016; Revised 9 January 2017; Accepted 18 January 2017; Published 16 February 2017

Academic Editor: Clara G. de los Reyes-Gavilan

Copyright © 2017 Elena Herrmann et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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