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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 1856713, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1856713
Research Article

Protective Effect of a Polyherbal Aqueous Extract Comprised of Nigella sativa (Seeds), Hemidesmus indicus (Roots), and Smilax glabra (Rhizome) on Bleomycin Induced Cytogenetic Damage in Human Lymphocytes

1Department of Biochemistry and Clinical Chemistry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Kelaniya, Ragama, Sri Lanka
2Institute of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, and Biotechnology, University of Colombo, Colombo, Sri Lanka
3Department of Human Genetics, Sri Ramachandra University, Chennai, India
4Department of Oncologic Sciences, Mitchell Cancer Institute, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Bandula Prasanna Galhena; moc.oohay@ann77asarp

Received 31 January 2017; Revised 4 April 2017; Accepted 16 April 2017; Published 25 May 2017

Academic Editor: Blanca Laffon

Copyright © 2017 Bandula Prasanna Galhena et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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