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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 1879437, 6 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1879437
Review Article

The Effect of Osteopontin on Microglia

Department of Ophthalmology, Ruijin Hospital Affiliated Medical School, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200025, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Yisheng Zhong; moc.621@86gnohzsy

Received 17 February 2017; Revised 29 April 2017; Accepted 24 May 2017; Published 18 June 2017

Academic Editor: Tarja Malm

Copyright © 2017 Huan Yu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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