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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 2031627, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2031627
Clinical Study

Do Tonic Itch and Pain Stimuli Draw Attention towards Their Location?

1Health, Medical, and Neuropsychology Unit, Faculty of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Leiden University, Leiden, Netherlands
2Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition (LIBC), Leiden University, Leiden, Netherlands
3Department of Psychiatry, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands
4Department of Experimental-Clinical and Health Psychology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium
5Department of Dermatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands
6Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Research Unit INSIDE, Institute of Health and Behaviour, University of Luxembourg, Esch-sur-Alzette, Luxembourg
7Centre for Pain Research, University of Bath, Bath, UK

Correspondence should be addressed to Antoinette I. M. van Laarhoven; ln.vinunediel.wsf@nevohraalnav.a

Received 28 April 2017; Revised 8 August 2017; Accepted 12 November 2017; Published 7 December 2017

Academic Editor: Kenji Takamori

Copyright © 2017 Antoinette I. M. van Laarhoven et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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