Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 2657913, 6 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2657913
Research Article

Kawasaki Disease Increases the Incidence of Myopia

1Department of Veterinary Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan
2Department of Pediatrics, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan
3College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan
4Department of Ophthalmology, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan
5Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan
6Department of Pediatrics, Changhua Christian Children’s Hospital, Changhua, Taiwan
7School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan
8Department of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan
9School of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan
10Management Office for Health Data, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan
11Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan
12Research Center for Chinese Medicine & Acupuncture, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan

Correspondence should be addressed to Yong-San Huang; wt.ude.uhcn.liam@gnauhsy, Hui-Ju Lin; wt.gro.humc.liam@6932d, and Lei Wan; moc.liamg@3791nawiel

Received 10 January 2017; Revised 30 April 2017; Accepted 11 June 2017; Published 30 July 2017

Academic Editor: Jeremy A. Guggenheim

Copyright © 2017 Yung-Jen Kung et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The prevalence of myopia has rapidly increased in recent decades and has led to a considerable global public health concern. In this study, we elucidate the relationship between Kawasaki disease (KD) and the incidence of myopia. We used Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database to conduct a population-based cohort study. We identified patients diagnosed with KD and individuals without KD who were selected by frequency matched based on sex, age, and the index year. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to estimate the hazard ratio and 95% confidence intervals for the comparison of the 2 cohorts. The log-rank test was used to test the incidence of myopia in the 2 cohorts. A total of 532 patients were included in the KD cohort and 2128 in the non-KD cohort. The risk of myopia (hazard ratio, 1.31; 95% confidence interval, 1.08–1.58; ) was higher among patients with KD than among those in the non-KD cohort. The Cox proportional hazards regression model showed that irrespective of age, gender, and urbanization, Kawasaki disease was an independent risk factor for myopia. Patients with Kawasaki disease exhibited a substantially higher risk for developing myopia.