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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 2690187, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2690187
Research Article

Failure of the PTEN/aPKC/Lgl Axis Primes Formation of Adult Brain Tumours in Drosophila

Department of “Pharmacy and Biotechnology”, University of Bologna, Via Selmi 3, 40126 Bologna, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Daniela Grifoni; ti.obinu@inofirg.aleinad

Received 25 July 2017; Revised 2 November 2017; Accepted 8 November 2017; Published 27 December 2017

Academic Editor: Sara Piccirillo

Copyright © 2017 Simona Paglia et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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