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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 2957538, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2957538
Research Article

Role of Phosphorylated HDAC4 in Stroke-Induced Angiogenesis

1Department of Neurosurgery, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People’s Hospital, Shanghai, China
2Graduate School of Nanchang University, Nanchang, China
3Institute of Microsurgery on Extremities, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People’s Hospital, Shanghai, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Yang Wang; moc.621@nc36ygnaw and Zhi-Feng Deng; moc.621@36fzgned

Received 27 August 2016; Accepted 1 December 2016; Published 3 January 2017

Academic Editor: Gelin Xu

Copyright © 2017 Juan Liu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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