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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 3104564, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3104564
Research Article

Affective Synchrony and Autonomic Coupling during Cooperation: A Hyperscanning Study

1Research Unit in Affective and Social Neuroscience, Catholic University of Milan, Milan, Italy
2Department of Psychology, Catholic University of Milan, Milan, Italy
3Department of Philosophy, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Maria Elide Vanutelli; ti.ttacinu@illetunav.edileairam

Received 10 June 2017; Accepted 6 November 2017; Published 27 November 2017

Academic Editor: Margaret A. Niznikiewicz

Copyright © 2017 Maria Elide Vanutelli et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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