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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 3676089, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3676089
Research Article

Human Excretion of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ether Flame Retardants: Blood, Urine, and Sweat Study

1Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada
2University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada
3University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada

Correspondence should be addressed to Stephen J. Genuis; ac.wahs@siunegs

Received 30 August 2016; Accepted 26 February 2017; Published 8 March 2017

Academic Editor: Stelvio M. Bandiera

Copyright © 2017 Shelagh K. Genuis et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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