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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 3702605, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3702605
Research Article

Outcome of Critically Ill Patients with Testicular Cancer

1Department of Critical Care Medicine, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, 14080 Mexico City, Mexico
2Department of Critical Care Medicine, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, 14000 Mexico City, Mexico
3Department of Critical Care Medicine, Fundación Clínica Médica Sur, 14050 Mexico City, Mexico

Correspondence should be addressed to Silvio A. Ñamendys-Silva

Received 5 May 2017; Accepted 19 September 2017; Published 26 October 2017

Academic Editor: Christian Schwentner

Copyright © 2017 Silvio A. Ñamendys-Silva et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Purpose. To evaluate the clinical characteristics and outcomes of critically ill patients with testicular cancer (TC) admitted to an oncological intensive care unit (ICU). Methods. This was a prospective observational study. There were no interventions. Results. During the study period, 1,402 patients with TC were admitted to the Department of Oncology, and 60 patients (4.3%) were admitted to the ICU. The most common histologic type was nonseminomatous germ cell tumors (55/91.7%). The ICU, hospital, and 6-month mortality rates were 38.3%, 45%, and 63.3%, respectively. The Cox multivariate analysis identified the white blood cells count (HR = 1.06, 95% CI = 1.01–1.11, and ), ionized calcium (iCa) level (HR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.01–1.50, and ), and 2 or more organ failures during the first 24 hours after ICU admission (HR = 3.86, 95% CI = 1.96–7.59, and ) as independent predictors of death for up to 6 months. Conclusion. The ICU, hospital, and 6-month mortality rates were 38.3%, 45%, and 63.3%, respectively. The factors associated with an increased 6-month mortality rate were white blood cells count, iCa level, and 2 or more organ failures during the first 24 hours after ICU admission.