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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 3710404, 5 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3710404
Research Article

Bacterial Diversity in Feline Conjunctiva Based on 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis: A Pilot Study

1Department of Epizootiology with Clinic for Birds and Exotic Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Norwida 31, 50-356 Wrocław, Poland
2Department of Food Hygiene and Consumer Health Protection, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Norwida 31, 50-356 Wrocław, Poland
3Department and Clinic of Veterinary Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Norwida 31, 50-356 Wrocław, Poland

Correspondence should be addressed to Zdzisław Kiełbowicz; lp.ude.rwpu@zciwobleik.walsizdz

Received 30 August 2017; Revised 25 October 2017; Accepted 6 November 2017; Published 27 November 2017

Academic Editor: Daniele Corsaro

Copyright © 2017 Katarzyna Płoneczka-Janeczko et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Changes in the microbial populations in the conjunctival sacs of animals have traditionally been evaluated using conventional microbiology techniques. The goal of this study was to examine the suitability of a methodology which may reveal a previously unknown microbiome inhabiting feline conjunctival membranes. In the present study, we determined the microbial diversity in feline conjunctivas based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Five taxa not described earlier in veterinary ophthalmology (i.e., Staphylococcus caprae, Staphylococcus succinus, Propionibacterium acnes, Psychrobacter faecalis, and Bacillus subtilis) were identified in feline conjunctivas with a high similarity (99-100%). The study demonstrates that the feline conjunctival sacs are inhabited by much more rich and diverse microbial communities than previously thought using culture-based methods. From the clinical perspective, this could suggest that other laboratory procedures (e.g., extended incubation time in the case of Actinobacteria, formerly order Actinomycetales) or a new tool like culture-independent approaches (next-generation DNA sequencing) should be taken into account.