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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 3729401, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3729401
Research Article

Pattern and Appropriateness of Medicines Prescribed to Outpatients at a University Hospital in Northwestern Ethiopia

1Department of Pharmaceutics and Social Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
2Department of Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia
3Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia
4Research Center for Generational Health and Ageing, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia
5Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia

Correspondence should be addressed to Fitsum Sebsibe Teni; moc.liamg@4estif

Received 18 July 2017; Accepted 26 November 2017; Published 18 December 2017

Academic Editor: Kurt G. Naber

Copyright © 2017 Fitsum Sebsibe Teni et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The study assessed the pattern and appropriateness of medicines prescribed to outpatients at Gondar University Referral Hospital in northwestern Ethiopia. An institution-based cross-sectional study was employed, through interviews and prescription reviews, among 346 patients at the outpatient pharmacy, from 2nd to 20th of May 2016. Data on sociodemographic profile of patients and medicines prescribed to them were collected. A mean of 1.72 medicines per encounter was prescribed, over a third of the total being anti-infectives. Patients were able to get about 85% of these medicines. An unskilled government employee would be required to work more than one and a half day to be able to afford the average priced medicine. Among prescriptions with two or more medicines, more than a third had at least one potential drug-drug interaction (PDDI), the commonest pair containing amoxicillin and doxycycline. Being male, being older (50–59 years), and increased number of medicines were associated with higher likelihood of PDDIs. In conclusion, the number of medicines prescribed per encounter was up to accepted standard. However, their availability fell short, together with considerable cost. Regarding appropriateness, a significant proportion of potential drug-drug interactions is identified and associated with patient’s sex, age, and number of medicines prescribed.