Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 3919080, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3919080
Research Article

Interventions: Employees’ Perceptions of What Reduces Stress

1Asia Pacific Centre for Work, Health and Safety, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia
2School of Engineering, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia
3School of Psychology, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia
4School of Management, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia

Correspondence should be addressed to Silvia Pignata; ua.ude.asinu@atangip.aivlis

Received 23 May 2017; Accepted 5 November 2017; Published 29 November 2017

Academic Editor: Hui X. Wang

Copyright © 2017 Silvia Pignata et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. N. Mucci, G. Giorgi, M. Roncaioli, J. F. Perez, and G. Arcangeli, “The correlation between stress and economic crisis: A systematic review,” Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, vol. 12, pp. 983–993, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. Health Safety Executive (HSE, Managing the causes of work-related stress: A step-by-step approach using the Management Standards, May 5, Accessed, 2017, http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/priced/hsg218.pdf.
  3. J. Skakon, K. Nielsen, V. Borg, and J. Guzman, “Are leaders' well-being, behaviours and style associated with the affective well-being of their employees? A systematic review of three decades of research,” Work and Stress, vol. 24, no. 2, pp. 107–139, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. M. P. Leiter, A. B. Bakker, and C. Maslach, Burnout at work: A psychological perspective, Psychology Press, Hove, Sussex, 2014. View at Scopus
  5. H. Coates and L. Goedegebuure, “The real academic revolution: Why we need to reconceptualise Australia's future academic workforce, and eight possible strategies for how to go about this, Research Briefing,” L H Martin Institute, 2010. View at Google Scholar
  6. G. Kinman and S. Wray, Taking its Toll: Rising Stress Levels in Further Education, UCU Publications, 2014.
  7. A. H. Winefield, C. M. Boyd, J. Saebel, and S. Pignata, Job stress in university staff: An Australian research study, Australian Academic Press, QLD: Bowen Hills, Queensland, 2008.
  8. J. Z. Carr, A. M. Schmidt, J. Kevin Ford, and R. P. DeShon, “Climate perceptions matter: A meta-analytic path analysis relating molar climate, cognitive and affective states, and individual level work outcomes,” Journal of Applied Psychology, vol. 88, no. 4, pp. 605–619, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. M. Dollard, A. Zadow, S. Pignata, and T. Bailey, “Stress Management,” in Global Encyclopedia of Public Administration, Public Policy and Governance, Springer International Press, 2016. View at Google Scholar
  10. S. I. Giga, C. L. Cooper, and B. Faragher, “The development of a framework for a comprehensive approach to stress management interventions at work,” International Journal of Stress Management, vol. 10, no. 4, pp. 280–296, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. C. Biron and M. Karanika-Murray, “Process evaluation for organizational stress and well-being interventions: implications for theory, method, and practice,” International Journal of Stress Management, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 85–111, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. S. I. Giga, A. J. Noblet, B. Faragher, and C. L. Cooper, “The UK perspective: A review of research on organisational stress management interventions,” Australian Psychologist, vol. 38, no. 2, pp. 158–164, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. A. D. LaMontagne, T. Keegel, A. M. Louie, A. Ostry, and P. A. Landsbergis, “A systematic review of the job-stress intervention evaluation literature, 1990–2005,” International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health, vol. 13, no. 3, pp. 268–280, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. M. Karanika-Murray, C. Biron, and P. Ø. Saksvik, “Organizational Health Interventions: Advances in Evaluation Methodology,” Stress and Health, vol. 32, no. 4, pp. 255–257, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. R. B. Briner and S. Reynolds, “The costs, benefits, and limitations of organizational level stress interventions,” Journal of Organizational Behavior, vol. 20, no. 5, pp. 647–664, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. A. B. Bakker and E. Demerouti, “The job demands-resources model: state of the art,” Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 22, no. 3, pp. 309–328, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. E. Demerouti, A. B. Bakker, F. Nachreiner, and W. B. Schaufeli, “The job demands-resources model of burnout,” Journal of Applied Psychology, vol. 86, no. 3, pp. 499–512, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. W. B. Schaufeli and A. B. Bakker, “Job demands, job resources, and their relationship with burnout and engagement: a multi-sample study,” Journal of Organizational Behavior, vol. 25, no. 3, pp. 293–315, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. E. R. Crawford, J. A. LePine, and B. L. Rich, “Linking job demands and resources to employee engagement and burnout: A theoretical extension and meta-analytic test,” Journal of Applied Psychology, vol. 95, no. 5, pp. 834–848, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. N. P. Podsakoff, J. A. Lepine, and M. A. Lepine, “Differential challenge stressor-hindrance stressor relationships with job attitudes, turnover intentions, turnover, and withdrawal behavior: A meta-analysis,” Journal of Applied Psychology, vol. 92, no. 2, pp. 438–454, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. M. R. Tuckey, B. J. Searle, C. M. Boyd, A. H. Winefield, and H. R. Winefield, “Hindrances are not threats: Advancing the multidimensionality of work stress,” Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 131–147, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. E. L. Deci and R. M. Ryan, “Self-determination theory and the facilitation of intrinsic motivation, social development, and well-being,” American Psychologist (Salma), vol. 55, no. 1, pp. 68–78, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. S. G. Trépanier, J. Forest, C. Fernet, and S. Austin, “On the psychological and motivational processes linking job characteristics to employee functioning: Insights from self-determination theory,” Work and Stress, vol. 29, no. 3, pp. 286–305, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. D. Xanthopoulou, A. B. Bakker, E. Demerouti, and W. B. Schaufeli, “Reciprocal relationships between job resources, personal resources, and work engagement,” Journal of Vocational Behavior, vol. 74, no. 3, pp. 235–244, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. K. Nytrø, P. Ø. Saksvik, A. Mikkelsen, P. Bohle, and M. Quinlan, “An appraisal of key factors in the implementation of occupational stress interventions,” Work and Stress, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 213–225, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. R. S. DeFrank and C. L. Cooper, “Worksite Stress Management Interventions: Their Effectiveness and Conceptualisation,” Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 4–10, 1987. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. A. H. Winefield, N. Gillespie, C. Stough, J. Dua, J. Hapuarachchi, and C. Boyd, “Occupational Stress in Australian University Staff: Results From a National Survey,” International Journal of Stress Management, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 51–63, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. N. A. Gillespie, M. Walsh, C. Stough, A. H. Winefield, and J. Dua, “Occupational stress in universities: Staff perceptions of the causes, consequences and moderators of stress,” Work and Stress, vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 53–72, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. A. H. Winefield and R. Jarrett, “Occupational Stress in University Staff,” International Journal of Stress Management, vol. 8, no. 4, pp. 285–298, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. A. H. Winefield, N. Gillespie, C. Stough, J. Dua, and J. Hapuarachchi, Occupational stress in Australian Universities: A national survey, South Melbourne: National Tertiary Education Union, 2002.
  31. R. Boyatzis, Transforming Qualitative Information: Thematic Analysis and Code Development, Sage, Thousand Oaks, CA, 1998.
  32. S. E. Hobfoll, R. J. Johnson, N. Ennis, and A. P. Jackson, “Resource Loss, Resource Gain, and Emotional Outcomes Among Inner City Women,” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, vol. 84, no. 3, pp. 632–643, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. P. Bordia, S. L. D. Restubog, N. L. Jimmieson, and B. E. Irmer, “Haunted by the past: Effects of poor change management history on employee attitudes and turnover,” Group & Organization Management, vol. 36, no. 2, pp. 191–222, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. L. Rhoades and R. Eisenberger, “Perceived organizational support: a review of the literature,” Journal of Applied Psychology, vol. 87, no. 4, pp. 698–714, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. R. K. Lobban, J. Husted, and V. T. Farewell, “A comparison of the effect of job demand, decision latitude, role and supervisory style on self-reported job satisfaction,” Work and Stress, vol. 12, no. 4, pp. 337–350, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. R. Law, M. F. Dollard, M. R. Tuckey, and C. Dormann, “Psychosocial safety climate as a lead indicator of workplace bullying and harassment, job resources, psychological health and employee engagement,” Accident Analysis & Prevention, vol. 43, no. 5, pp. 1782–1793, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. C. Teo and L. Waters, “The role of human resource practices in reducing occupational stress and strain,” International Journal of Stress Management, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 207–226, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. S. E. Hobfoll, “Conservation of resources: a new attempt at conceptualizing stress,” American Psychologist (Salma), vol. 44, no. 3, pp. 513–524, 1989. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. S. Cohen and T. A. Wills, “Stress, social support, and the buffering hypothesis,” Psychological Bulletin, vol. 98, no. 2, pp. 310–357, 1985. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  40. C. K. W. de Dreu, D. van Dierendonck, and M. de Best-Waldhober, “Conflict at work and individual wellbeing,” in International Handbook of Work and Health Psychology, M. Schabracq, J. A. M. Winnubst, and C. L. Cooper, Eds., pp. 495–515, Chichester, UK, 2002.
  41. M. Elovainio and M. Kivimäki, “The effects of personal need for structure and occupational identity in the role stress process,” The Journal of Social Psychology, vol. 141, no. 3, pp. 365–378, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. A. Mikkelsen and M. Gundersen, “The Effect of a Participatory Organizational Intervention on Work Environment, Job Stress, and Subjective Health Complaints,” International Journal of Stress Management, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 91–110, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  43. C. M. Youssef-Morgan and D. A. Sundermann, “Positive interventions: from prevention to amplification,” in An Introduction to Contemporary Work Psychology Multilevel theory, research, and methods in organizations: Foundations, extensions, and new directions, M. C. W. Peeters, J. De Jonge, and T. W. Taris, Eds., pp. 458–480, West Sussex, UK: Wiley, 2014. View at Google Scholar
  44. B. Jones, D. M. Flynn, and E. K. Kelloway, “Perception of support from the organization in relation to work stress, satisfaction, and commitment,” in Organizational risk factors for job stress, S. L. Sauter and L. R. Murphy, Eds., pp. 41–52, American Psychological Association, Washington, DC, 1996. View at Google Scholar
  45. L. D. Sargent and D. J. Terry, “The effects of work control and job demands on employee adjustment and work performance,” Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, vol. 71, no. 3, pp. 219–236, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  46. T. W. Lee, Using Qualitative Methods in Organizational Research, Sage, Thousand Oaks, Calif, USA, 1999.
  47. T. S. Bailey, M. F. Dollard, and P. A. M. Richards, “A national standard for psychosocial safety climate (PSC): PSC 41 as the benchmark for low risk of job strain and depressive symptoms,” Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 15–26, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  48. J. R. Bradley and V. Sutherland, “Stress Management in the Workplace,” Employee Counselling Today, vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 4–9, 1994. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  49. C. Ostroff and D. E. Bowen, “Moving HR to a higher level: HR Practices and organizational effectiveness,” in Multilevel Theory, Research, and Methods in Organizations: Foundations, Extensions, and New Directions, J. K. Klein and S. W. J. Kozlowski, Eds., pp. 512–553, Pfeiffer, Hoboken, NJ, USA, 2000. View at Google Scholar
  50. S. Pignata and A. H. Winefield, “Stress-reduction interventions in an Australian university: a case study,” Stress and Health, vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 24–34, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus