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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 3948360, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3948360
Review Article

Aβ Peptide Originated from Platelets Promises New Strategy in Anti-Alzheimer’s Drug Development

1School of Medicine, Department of Physiology, Universidad Central del Caribe, Bayamon, PR, USA
2School of Medicine, Department of Biochemistry, Universidad Central del Caribe, Bayamon, PR, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Mikhail Y. Inyushin; ude.ebiraccu@nihsuyni.liahkim

Received 1 June 2017; Accepted 10 July 2017; Published 5 September 2017

Academic Editor: Xudong Huang

Copyright © 2017 Mikhail Y. Inyushin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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