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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 4346576, 17 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4346576
Review Article

Immunotherapy in Gastrointestinal Cancers

1Division of Medical Oncology 1, Istituto Oncologico Veneto, IRCCS, Padova, Italy
2Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology, University of Padova, Padova, Italy
3Department of Medicine, Surgical Pathology & Cytopathology Unit, University of Padova, Padova, Italy
4Division of Molecular Carcinogenesis, Cancer Genomics Center Netherlands, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, Netherlands
5Department of Radiological, Oncological and Pathological Sciences, Policlinico Umberto I University Hospital, Rome, Italy
6Department of Medical Oncology, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario Agostino Gemelli, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Sara Lonardi

Received 7 April 2017; Accepted 18 May 2017; Published 3 July 2017

Academic Editor: Carmen Criscitiello

Copyright © 2017 Letizia Procaccio et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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