Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 4957348, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4957348
Research Article

Reported Male Circumcision Practices in a Muslim-Majority Setting

1Department of General Surgery, The Indus Hospital, Korangi Crossing, Karachi 75190, Pakistan
2Department of Surgical Oncology, Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital & Research Centre, 7-A Block R-3, Johar Town, Lahore, Pakistan
3Department of Pediatric Surgery, The Indus Hospital, Korangi Crossing, Karachi 75190, Pakistan
4Indus Hospital Research Center, The Indus Hospital, Korangi Crossing, Karachi 75190, Pakistan

Correspondence should be addressed to Lubna Samad; gro.hcraeserdri@damas.anbul

Received 10 August 2016; Revised 30 November 2016; Accepted 15 December 2016; Published 17 January 2017

Academic Editor: Pere Domingo

Copyright © 2017 Abdul Wahid Anwer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. S. A. H. Rizvi, S. A. A. Naqvi, M. Hussain, and A. S. Hasan, “Religious circumcision: a muslim view,” BJU International, Supplement, vol. 83, no. 1, pp. 13–16, 1999. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. World Health Organization and JHPIEGO, Manual for Early Infant Male Circumcision under Local Anaesthesia, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland, 2010.
  3. S. Arie, “Circumcision: divided we fall,” British Medical Journal, vol. 341, article c4266, 2010. View at Google Scholar
  4. American Academy of Pediatrics Task Force on Circumcision, “Male circumcision,” Pediatrics, vol. 130, no. 3, pp. e756–e785, 2012. View at Google Scholar
  5. J. H. Ledikwe, R. O. Nyanga, J. Hagon, J. S. Grignon, M. Mpofu, and B. W. Semo, “Scaling-up voluntary medical male circumcision—what have we learned?” HIV/AIDS—Research and Palliative Care, vol. 6, pp. 139–146, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  6. P. Jarrett, M. Kliner, and J. Walley, “Early infant male circumcision for human immunodeficiency virus prevention: knowledge and attitudes of women attending a rural hospital in Swaziland, Southern Africa,” SAHARA Journal, vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 61–66, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  7. W. Mavhu, K. Hatzold, S. M. Laver et al., “Acceptability of early infant male circumcision as an HIV prevention intervention in Zimbabwe: a qualitative perspective,” PLoS ONE, vol. 7, no. 2, Article ID e32475, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. H. Weiss, J. Polonsky, R. Bailey, C. Hankins, D. Halperin, and G. Schmid, Male Circumcision: Global Trends and Determinants of Prevalence, Safety, and Acceptability, vol. 35, World Health Organization, UNAIDS, Geneva, Switzerland, 2008.
  9. F. Şahin, U. Beyazova, and A. Aktürk, “Attitudes and practices regarding circumcision in Turkey,” Child: Care, Health and Development, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 275–280, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. V. R. Jayanthi, J. E. Burns, and S. A. Koff, “Postneonatal circumcision with local anesthesia: a cost-effective alternative,” The Journal of Urology, vol. 161, no. 4, pp. 1301–1303, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. K. P. Manji, “Circumcision of the young infant in a developing country using the Plastibell™,” Annals of Tropical Paediatrics: International Child Health, vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 101–104, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. F. A. Moosa, F. W. Khan, and M. H. Rao, “Comparison of complications of circumcision by ‘plastibell device technique’ in male neonates and infants,” Journal of the Pakistan Medical Association, vol. 60, no. 8, pp. 664–667, 2010. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. R. C. Bailey, R. Muga, R. Poulussen, and H. Abicht, “The acceptability of male circumcision to reduce HIV infections in Nyanza Province, Kenya,” AIDS Care, vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 27–40, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. M. Z. Iqbal, M. Z. Ali, S. Masood, M. Anwar, M. Jahangir, and S. Irum, “Methods of circumcision practiced in Central Pakistan and their complications,” Journal Of Sheikh Zayed Medical College, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 56–59, 2010. View at Google Scholar
  15. K. Mahmood, Z. M. Nagra, S. Ahmad, M. A. Malik, and S. Hameed, “Circumcision trends in Pakistan,” Journal of University Medical and Dental College, vol. 1, pp. 17–21, 2015. View at Google Scholar
  16. C. Demirdover, B. Sahin, H. Vayvada, and H. Y. Oztan, “Keloid formation after circumcision and its treatment,” Journal of Pediatric Urology, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. e54–e56, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. National Institute of Population Studies (NIPS) [Pakistan] and ICF International, Pakistan Demographic and Health Survey 2012-13, NIPS and ICF International, Islamabad, Pakistan, 2013.
  18. V. Palit, D. K. Menebhi, I. Taylor, M. Young, Y. Elmasry, and T. Shah, “A unique service in UK delivering Plastibell® circumcision: review of 9-year results,” Pediatric Surgery International, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 45–48, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. S. Blank, M. Brady, E. Buerk et al., “Male circumcision,” Pediatrics, vol. 130, no. 3, pp. e756–e785, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. H. A. Weiss, N. Larke, D. Halperin, and I. Schenker, “Complications of circumcision in male neonates, infants and children: a systematic review,” BMC Urology, vol. 10, article 2, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. UNICEF, UNICEF—70 years for every child: Pakistan, December 2013, http://www.unicef.org/infobycountry/pakistan_pakistan_statistics.html.
  22. WHO and UNAIDS, Neonatal and Child Male Circumcision: A Global Review, WHO, Geneva‎, Switzerland, 2010.
  23. R. M. Plank, N. O. Ndubuka, K. Wirth et al., “A randomized trial of Mogen clamp versus Plastibell for neonatal male circumcision in Botswana,” Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, vol. 62, no. 5, pp. e131–e137, 2013. View at Google Scholar
  24. C. Bode, A. Ademuyiwa, E. Jeje, O. Elebute, O. Adesanya, and S. Ikhisemojie, “Preferred methods of male neonatal circumcision among mothers in lagos Nigeria,” Journal of the West African College of Surgeons, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 29–37, 2011. View at Google Scholar
  25. K. Bowa, M. S. Li, B. Mugisa et al., “A controlled trial of three methods for neonatal circumcision in Lusaka, Zambia,” Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, vol. 62, no. 1, pp. e1–e6, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. I. A. Jan, “Circumcision in babies and children with plastibell technique: an easy procedure with minimal complications—experience of 316 cases,” Pakistan Journal of Medical Sciences, vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 175–180, 2004. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. K. P. Manji, “Circumcision of the young infant in a developing country using the Plastibell™,” Annals of Tropical Paediatrics, vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 101–104, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. J. Rehman, U. Ghani, K. Shehzad, and I. A. Sheikh, “Circumcision-a comparative study,” Pakistan Armed Forces Medical Journal, vol. 57, pp. 286–288, 2007. View at Google Scholar
  29. K. Rafiq, “Plastibell-a quick technique to decrease the distress of neonatal circumcision,” Annals of King Edward Medical College, vol. 6, pp. 412–413, 2000. View at Google Scholar
  30. G. Kigozi, M. Wawer, A. Ssettuba et al., “Foreskin surface area and HIV acquisition in Rakai, Uganda (size matters),” AIDS, vol. 23, no. 16, pp. 2209–2213, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus