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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 5134602, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5134602
Research Article

The Use of Antidepressants, Anxiolytics, and Hypnotics in People with Type 2 Diabetes and Patterns Associated with Use: The Hoorn Diabetes Care System Cohort

1EMGO+ Institute for Health and Care Research, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands
2Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacy, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands
3Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands
4Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands
5Department of General Practice and Elderly Care Medicine, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands
6Department of Psychiatry, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands

Correspondence should be addressed to R. Mast; ln.cmuv@tsam.m

Received 21 August 2016; Accepted 27 December 2016; Published 23 January 2017

Academic Editor: Jessica J. Jalbert

Copyright © 2017 R. Mast et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective. With depression being present in approximately 20% of people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), we expect equally frequent prescription of antidepressants, anxiolytics, and hypnotics. Nevertheless, prescription data in people with T2DM is missing and the effect of depression on glycaemic control is contradictory. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of antidepressants, anxiolytics, and/or hypnotics use in a large, managed, primary care system cohort of people with T2DM and to determine the sociodemographic characteristics, comorbidities, T2DM medication, and metabolic control associated with its use. Method. The prevalence of antidepressants, anxiolytics, and/or hypnotics use in the years 2007–2012 was assessed in the Hoorn Diabetes Care System Cohort from the Netherlands. Results. From the 7016 people with T2DM, 500 people (7.1%) used antidepressants only, 456 people (6.5%) used anxiolytics and/or hypnotics only, and 254 people (3.6%) used a combination. Conclusion. We conclude that in our managed, primary care system 17% of all people with T2DM used antidepressants, anxiolytics, and/or hypnotics. Users of antidepressants, anxiolytics, and/or hypnotics were more often female, non-Caucasian, lower educated, and more often treated with insulin.