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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 5245021, 15 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5245021
Review Article

Emerging and Neglected Infectious Diseases: Insights, Advances, and Challenges

Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, School of Biomedical and Allied Health Sciences, University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana

Correspondence should be addressed to Nicholas Israel Nii-Trebi; hg.ude.shc@ibertnn

Received 13 August 2016; Revised 5 January 2017; Accepted 16 January 2017; Published 13 February 2017

Academic Editor: André Talvani

Copyright © 2017 Nicholas Israel Nii-Trebi. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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