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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 5270940, 15 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5270940
Research Article

Computational Exploration for Lead Compounds That Can Reverse the Nuclear Morphology in Progeria

1Division of Applied Life Science (BK21 Plus), Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Research Center (PMBBRC), Systems and Synthetic Agrobiotech Center (SSAC), Research Institute of Natural Science (RINS), Gyeongsang National University (GNU), 501 Jinju-daero, Jinju 52828, Republic of Korea
2College of Pharmacy, Inje University, 197 Inje-ro, Gimhae, Gyeongnam 50834, Republic of Korea
3Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University, Gyeongnam, Republic of Korea

Correspondence should be addressed to Seok Ju Park; ten.liamnah@sisenegjsp and Keun Woo Lee; rk.ca.ung@eelwk

Received 25 July 2017; Accepted 24 September 2017; Published 26 October 2017

Academic Editor: Rituraj Purohit

Copyright © 2017 Shailima Rampogu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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