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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 5450829, 6 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5450829
Research Article

Identification of Clostridium difficile Asymptomatic Carriers in a Tertiary Care Hospital

1Clinical Laboratory, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP, Brazil
2Division of Medical Practice, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP, Brazil
3Office of Clinical Quality, Safety and Performance Improvement, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA, USA
4Instituto Israelita de Ensino e Pesquisa Albert Einstein, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP, Brazil

Correspondence should be addressed to Alexandre R. Marra

Received 13 April 2017; Revised 11 August 2017; Accepted 27 August 2017; Published 2 October 2017

Academic Editor: Naohiko Masaki

Copyright © 2017 André Luiz de Oliveira Silva et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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