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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 6379639, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6379639
Research Article

Association of Polymorphisms of the Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts Gene with Schizophrenia in a Han Chinese Population

1Department of Neurology, Affiliated Hospital of Guangdong Medical University, Zhanjiang, Guangdong 524001, China
2Institute of Neurology, Affiliated Hospital of Guangdong Medical University, Zhanjiang, Guangdong 524001, China
3Department of Psychiatry, Affiliated Hospital of Guangdong Medical University, Zhanjiang 524001, China
4Unit on Synapse Development and Plasticity, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA
5Stroke Center, Neurology & Neurosurgery Division, The Clinical Medicine Research Institute & The First Affiliated Hospital, Jinan University, Guangzhou, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Guoda Ma; moc.621@7011nahis and Keshen Li; moc.621@1791nehsekil

Received 17 October 2016; Revised 7 February 2017; Accepted 12 February 2017; Published 8 March 2017

Academic Editor: Margaret A. Niznikiewicz

Copyright © 2017 Jiawu Fu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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