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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 6713606, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6713606
Research Article

The Involvement of miR-29b-3p in Arterial Calcification by Targeting Matrix Metalloproteinase-2

1Department of Vascular Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi 530021, China
2Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi 530021, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Xiao Qin; moc.liamtoh@oaixniq_rd

Received 25 July 2016; Revised 5 November 2016; Accepted 15 November 2016; Published 9 January 2017

Academic Editor: Diego Franco

Copyright © 2017 Wenhong Jiang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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