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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 7047468, 6 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7047468
Research Article

Foot Structure in Boys with Down Syndrome

1Institute of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Rzeszow, Warszawska 26A Street, 35-205 Rzeszow, Poland
2Special Purpose School and Education Center, Mrowla 79C, 36-054 Mrowla, Poland
3Institute of Sport, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport, University of Physical Education in Krakow, 78th Jan Pawel II Avenue, 31-571 Krakow, Poland
4Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport, University of Physical Education in Krakow, 78th Jan Pawel II Avenue, 31-571 Krakow, Poland

Correspondence should be addressed to Ewa PuszczaƂowska-Lizis; lp.teno.atzcop@sizilawe

Received 27 February 2017; Accepted 17 July 2017; Published 21 August 2017

Academic Editor: Mario U. Manto

Copyright © 2017 Ewa Puszczałowska-Lizis et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Introduction and Aim. Down syndrome (DS) is associated with numerous developmental abnormalities, some of which cause dysfunctions of the posture and the locomotor system. The analysis of selected features of the foot structure in boys with DS versus their peers without developmental disorders is done. Materials and Methods. The podoscopic examination was performed on 30 boys with DS aged 14-15 years. A control group consisted of 30 age- and gender-matched peers without DS. Results. The feet of boys with DS are flatter compared to their healthy peers. The hallux valgus angle is not the most important feature differentiating the shape of the foot in the boys with DS and their healthy peers. In terms of the V toe setting, healthy boys had poorer results. Conclusions. Specialized therapeutic treatment in individuals with DS should involve exercises to increase the muscle strength around the foot joints, enhancing the stabilization in the joints and proprioception. Introducing orthotics and proper footwear is also important. It is also necessary to monitor the state of the foot in order to modify undertaken therapies.