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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 7047468, 6 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7047468
Research Article

Foot Structure in Boys with Down Syndrome

1Institute of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Rzeszow, Warszawska 26A Street, 35-205 Rzeszow, Poland
2Special Purpose School and Education Center, Mrowla 79C, 36-054 Mrowla, Poland
3Institute of Sport, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport, University of Physical Education in Krakow, 78th Jan Pawel II Avenue, 31-571 Krakow, Poland
4Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport, University of Physical Education in Krakow, 78th Jan Pawel II Avenue, 31-571 Krakow, Poland

Correspondence should be addressed to Ewa Puszczałowska-Lizis

Received 27 February 2017; Accepted 17 July 2017; Published 21 August 2017

Academic Editor: Mario U. Manto

Copyright © 2017 Ewa Puszczałowska-Lizis et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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