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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 7508316, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7508316
Research Article

Proteomic Analysis of Liver Proteins in a Rat Model of Chronic Restraint Stress-Induced Depression

1Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Bei San Huan Dong Lu 11, Chao Yang District, Beijing 100029, China
2Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Academy of Medical Science, Peking Union Medical College, Dong Dan San Tiao, Dong Cheng District, Beijing 100005, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Ming Xie; ten.362@306gnimeix

Received 9 September 2016; Revised 28 November 2016; Accepted 22 December 2016; Published 15 February 2017

Academic Editor: Koichiro Wada

Copyright © 2017 Cong Li et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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