Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
BioMed Research International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 7932019, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7932019
Research Article

Hibiscus syriacus Extract from an Established Cell Culture Stimulates Skin Wound Healing

1Dipartimento di Biologia, Università di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant’Angelo, Via Cintia 4, 80126 Napoli, Italy
2Arterra Bioscience, Via Brin 69, 80142 Napoli, Italy
3Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Università di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant’Angelo, Via Cintia 4, 80126 Napoli, Italy
4Vitalab srl, Via Brin 69, 80142 Napoli, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to V. Calabrò

Received 16 March 2017; Accepted 8 October 2017; Published 27 November 2017

Academic Editor: Richard Tucker

Copyright © 2017 O. di Martino et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. K. S. Midwood, L. V. Williams, and J. E. Schwarzbauer, “Tissue repair and the dynamics of the extracellular matrix,” The International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology, vol. 36, no. 6, pp. 1031–1037, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. A. H. Myer, “The effects of aging on wound healing,” Topics in Geriatric Rehabilitation, vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 1–10, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. S. Guo and L. A. DiPietro, “Critical review in oral biology & medicine: factors affecting wound healing,” Journal of Dental Research, vol. 89, no. 3, pp. 219–229, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. A. V. Rawlings and P. J. Matts, “Stratum Corneum Moisturization at the Molecular Level: An update in relation to the dry skin cycle,” Journal of Investigative Dermatology, vol. 124, no. 6, pp. 1099–1110, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. E. G. Maganha, R. D. C. Halmenschlager, R. M. Rosa, J. A. P. Henriques, A. L. L. D. P. Ramos, and J. Saffi, “Pharmacological evidences for the extracts and secondary metabolites from plants of the genus Hibiscus,” Food Chemistry, vol. 118, no. 1, pp. 1–10, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. S. W. Kwon, S. S. Hong, J. I. Kim, and I. H. Ahn, “Antioxidant properties of heat-treated Hibiscus syriacus,” Izvestiia Akademii Nauk. Seriia Biologicheskaia, vol. 1, pp. 20-21, 2003. View at Google Scholar
  7. Y. Cheng, S. Lee, H. Harn, H. Huang, and W. Chang, “The extract of Hibiscus syriacus inducing apoptosis by activating p53 and AIF in human lung cancer cells,” American Journal of Chinese Medicine, vol. 36, no. 1, pp. 171–184, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. R. Punasiya, R. Verma, and S. Pillai, “In vitro hair growth promoting activity of various leaves extract of Hibiscus syriacus L. on albino rats,” International Journal of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, vol. 5, no. 5, pp. 3565–3569, 2014. View at Google Scholar
  9. A. Bhaskar and V. Nithya, “Evaluation of the wound-healing activity of Hibiscus rosa sinensis L (Malvaceae) in Wistar albino rats,” Indian Journal of Pharmacology, vol. 44, no. 6, pp. 694–698, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. S. W. Yoon, K. P. Lee, D.-Y. Kim et al., “Effect of absolute from Hibiscus syriacus L. flower on wound healing in keratinocytes,” Pharmacognosy Magazine, vol. 13, no. 49, pp. 85–89, 2017. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. V. A. Bandyukova and L. V. Ligai, “Chemical study of the composition of the polyphenolic compounds of Hibiscus syriacus,” Chemistry of Natural Compounds, vol. 26, no. 4, pp. 470-471, 1990. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. A. Barbulova, F. Apone, and G. Colucci, “Plant Cell Cultures as Source of Cosmetic Active Ingredients,” Cosmetics, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 94–104, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  13. R. Moscatiello, B. Baldan, and L. Navazio, “Plant cell suspension cultures,” Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 953, pp. 77–93, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. M. Vivo, M. Ranieri, F. Sansone et al., “Mimicking p14ARF phosphorylation influences its ability to restrain cell proliferation,” PLoS ONE, vol. 8, no. 1, Article ID e53631, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. A. Di Costanzo, L. Festa, G. Roscigno et al., “A dominant mutation etiologic for human tricho-dento-osseous syndrome impairs the ability of DLX3 to downregulate ΔNp63α,” Journal of Cellular Physiology, vol. 226, no. 8, pp. 2189–2197, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. A. Tito, A. Carola, M. Bimonte et al., “A tomato stem cell extract, containing antioxidant compounds and metal chelating factors, protects skin cells from heavy metal-induced damages,” International Journal of Cosmetic Science, vol. 33, no. 6, pp. 543–552, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. M. Vivo, M. Matarese, M. Sepe et al., “MDM2-mediated degradation of p14ARF: A novel mechanism to control ARF levels in cancer cells,” PLoS ONE, vol. 10, no. 2, Article ID e0117252, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. M. Bimonte, A. De Lucia, A. Carola et al., “Galderia sulphuraria relieves oily and seborrheic skin by inhibiting the 5-a reductase expression in skin cells and reducing sebum production in vivo,” Trichol Cosmetol Open Journal, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 11–18, 2016. View at Google Scholar
  19. P. Ngo, P. Ramalingam, J. A. Phillips, and G. T. Furuta, “Collagen Gel Contraction Assay,” in Cell-cell interactions methods and protocols, Sean P. Colgan, Ed., Humana Press, Totowa, New Jersey, USA, 2006. View at Google Scholar
  20. B. Di Luccia, N. Manzo, M. Vivo et al., “A biochemical and cellular approach to explore the antiproliferative and prodifferentiative activity of Aloe arborescens leaf extract,” Phytotherapy Research, vol. 27, no. 12, pp. 1819–1828, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. J. Goldner, “A modification of the Masson trichrome technique for the routine laboratory purposes,” The American Journal of Pathology, vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 237–243, 1938. View at Google Scholar
  22. G. Borges Bubols, D. da Rocha Vianna, A. Medina-Remon et al., “The Antioxidant Activity of Coumarins and Flavonoids,” Mini-Reviews in Medicinal Chemistry, vol. 13, no. 3, pp. 318–334, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  23. E. P. Amento and L. S. Beck, “TGF-beta and wound healing.,” CIBA Foundation Symposia, vol. 157, pp. 115–123, 1991. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. H. Qin, X. Zheng, X. Zhong, A. K. Shetty, P. M. Elias, and W. B. Bollag, “Aquaporin-3 in keratinocytes and skin: its role and interaction with phospholipase D2,” Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics, vol. 508, no. 2, pp. 138–143, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. M. Del Carmen Velazquez Pereda, G. de Campos Dieamant, S. Eberlin et al., “Expression of differential genes involved in the maintenance of water balance in human skin by Piptadenia colubrina extract,” Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 35–43, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. C. Cao, S. Wan, Q. Jiang et al., “All-trans retinoic acid attenuates ultraviolet radiation-induced down-regulation of aquaporin-3 and water permeability in human keratinocytes,” Journal of Cellular Physiology, vol. 215, no. 2, pp. 506–516, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus