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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 8525912, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8525912
Research Article

Effects of Bacillus Serine Proteases on the Bacterial Biofilms

1Institute of Fundamental Medicine and Biology, Kazan Federal University, Kazan, Russia
2Texas A&M University Health Science Center, Bryan, TX, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Olga Mitrofanova; moc.liamg@agloafortim

Received 15 March 2017; Revised 5 July 2017; Accepted 16 July 2017; Published 21 August 2017

Academic Editor: Yu-Chang Tyan

Copyright © 2017 Olga Mitrofanova et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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