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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 9318534, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9318534
Research Article

Factors Influencing Burnout Syndrome in Obstetrics and Gynecology Physicians

1Behavioral Sciences Department, University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Gr. T. Popa”, Iași, Romania
2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Gr. T. Popa”, University Maternity Hospital “Cuza Voda”, Iași, Romania
3Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Gr. T. Popa”, Iași, Romania
4Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University “Alexandru Ioan Cuza”, Iași, Romania
5Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Gr. T. Popa”, Iași, Romania

Correspondence should be addressed to Vladimir Socolov; moc.oohay@rvolocos

Received 18 April 2017; Revised 21 August 2017; Accepted 6 November 2017; Published 5 December 2017

Academic Editor: Giulio Arcangeli

Copyright © 2017 Magdalena Iorga et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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