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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 9372050, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9372050
Review Article

Multiple Factors Involved in the Pathogenesis of White Matter Lesions

1Department of Neurology, Guangdong Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Major Neurological Diseases, National Key Clinical Department, National Key Discipline, First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080, China
2Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Prince of Wales Hospital, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong

Correspondence should be addressed to Yuhua Fan; moc.621@nasusnaf

Received 8 August 2016; Revised 9 January 2017; Accepted 26 January 2017; Published 21 February 2017

Academic Editor: Cheng-Xin Gong

Copyright © 2017 Jing Lin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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