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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 9486794, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9486794
Research Article

The Biocontrol Efficacy of Streptomyces pratensis LMM15 on Botrytis cinerea in Tomato

College of Plant Protection, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Yang Wang; nc.ude.fauswn@6002gnaygnaw

Received 22 February 2017; Revised 18 September 2017; Accepted 19 October 2017; Published 28 November 2017

Academic Editor: Taran Skjerdal

Copyright © 2017 Qinggui Lian et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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