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BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 9610810, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9610810
Research Article

Impact of Chestnut and Quebracho Tannins on Rumen Microbiota of Bovines

1Instituto de Patobiología, Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Agropecuarias, Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria, Calle Las Cabañas y Los Reseros s/n, Casilla de Correo 25, Castelar, 1712 Buenos Aires, Argentina
2Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Godoy Cruz 2290, 1425 Buenos Aires, Argentina
3Animal Nutrition, Silvateam, Indunor, Cerrito 1136, 1010 Buenos Aires, Argentina
4Instituto de Biotecnología, Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Agropecuarias, Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria, Calle Las Cabañas y Los Reseros s/n, Casilla de Correo 25, Castelar, 1712 Buenos Aires, Argentina
5Departamento de Producción Animal, Facultad de Agronomía, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Av. San Martín 4453, 1417 Buenos Aires, Argentina

Correspondence should be addressed to Mariano Enrique Fernández Miyakawa; ra.bog.atni@m.awakayimzednanref

Received 28 July 2017; Accepted 3 December 2017; Published 28 December 2017

Academic Editor: Yiannis Kourkoutas

Copyright © 2017 Juan María Díaz Carrasco et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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