Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
BioMed Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 9645874, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9645874
Research Article

Role of MicroRNA-103a Targeting ADAM10 in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

1Department of Vascular Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150001, China
2Biotechnology Institute, School of Environment and Chemical Engineering, Dalian Jiaotong University, Dalian 116028, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Hai-Yang Wang; nc.ude.umbrh@gnayiahgnaw

Received 27 October 2016; Revised 4 February 2017; Accepted 9 February 2017; Published 5 March 2017

Academic Editor: Xuwei Hou

Copyright © 2017 Tong Jiao et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. D.-C. Hao, L. Yang, P.-G. Xiao, and M. Liu, “Identification of Taxus microRNAs and their targets with high-throughput sequencing and degradome analysis,” Physiologia Plantarum, vol. 146, no. 4, pp. 388–403, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. M. Adam, U. Raaz, J. M. Spin, and P. S. Tsao, “MicroRNAs in abdominal aortic aneurysm,” Current Vascular Pharmacology, vol. 13, no. 3, pp. 280–290, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. J.-X. Wang, X.-J. Zhang, Q. Li et al., “MicroRNA-103/107 regulate programmed necrosis and myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury through targeting FADD,” Circulation Research, vol. 117, no. 4, pp. 352–363, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. J. Raffort, F. Lareyre, M. Clement, and Z. Mallat, “Micro-RNAs in abdominal aortic aneurysms: insights from animal models and relevance to human disease,” Cardiovascular Research, vol. 110, no. 2, pp. 165–177, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. F. M. Davis, D. L. Rateri, and A. Daugherty, “Abdominal aortic aneurysm: novel mechanisms and therapies,” Current Opinion in Cardiology, vol. 30, no. 6, pp. 566–573, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. Q. Wang, C. Shu, J. Su, and X. Li, “A crosstalk triggered by hypoxia and maintained by MCP-1/miR-98/IL-6/p38 regulatory loop between human aortic smooth muscle cells and macrophages leads to aortic smooth muscle cells apoptosis via Stat1 activation,” International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Pathology, vol. 8, no. 3, pp. 2670–2679, 2015. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. L. Maegdefessel, J. M. Spin, U. Raaz et al., “miR-24 limits aortic vascular inflammation and murine abdominal aneurysm development,” Nature Communication, vol. 5, article 5214, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  8. D. Mozaffarian, E. J. Benjamin, A. S. Go et al., “Heart disease and stroke statistics-2016 update: a report from the American Heart Association,” Circulation, vol. 133, no. 4, pp. 38–60, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  9. Y. Li, C. Yang, G. Ma et al., “Analysis of ADAM17 polymorphisms and susceptibility to sporadic abdominal aortic aneurysm,” Cellular Physiology and Biochemistry, vol. 33, no. 5, pp. 1426–1438, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. Y. Yao, J. Zhuang, Y. Li et al., “Association of polymorphisms of the receptor for advanced glycation end products gene and susceptibility to sporadic abdominal aortic aneurysm,” BioMed Research International, vol. 2015, Article ID 394126, 10 pages, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. S. Moncini, M. Lunghi, A. Valmadre et al., “The miR-15/107 family of microRNA genes regulates CDK5R1/p35 with implications for Alzheimer’s disease pathogenesis,” Molecular Neurobiology, pp. 1–14, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. R. Nonaka, Y. Miyake, T. Hata et al., “Circulating miR-103 and miR-720 as novel serum biomarkers for patients with colorectal cancer,” International Journal of Oncology, vol. 47, no. 3, pp. 1097–1102, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. N. Vatandoost, M. Amini, B. Iraj, S. Momenzadeh, and R. Salehi, “Dysregulated miR-103 and miR-143 expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from induced prediabetes and type 2 diabetes rats,” Gene, vol. 572, no. 1, pp. 95–100, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. M. Folkesson, C. Li, S. Frebelius et al., “Proteolytically active ADAM10 and ADAM17 carried on membrane microvesicles in human abdominal aortic aneurysms,” Thrombosis and Haemostasis, vol. 114, no. 6, pp. 1165–1174, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. L. Geng, W. Wang, Y. Chen et al., “Elevation of ADAM10, ADAM17, MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression with media degeneration features CaCl2-induced thoracic aortic aneurysm in a rat model,” Experimental and Molecular Pathology, vol. 89, no. 1, pp. 72–81, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. G. Ma, H. Wang, X. Gu et al., “CARP, a myostatin-downregulated gene in CFM cells, is a novel essential positive regulator of myogenesis,” International Journal of Biological Sciences, vol. 10, no. 3, pp. 309–320, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. D. C. Hao, S. L. Chen, A. Osbourn, V. G. Kontogianni, L. W. Liu, and M. J. Jordán, “Temporal transcriptome changes induced by methyl jasmonate in Salvia sclarea,” Gene, vol. 558, no. 1, pp. 41–53, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. M. J. M. Gooden, V. R. Wiersma, A. Boerma et al., “Elevated serum CXCL16 is an independent predictor of poor survival in ovarian cancer and may reflect pro-metastatic ADAM protease activity,” British Journal of Cancer, vol. 110, no. 6, pp. 1535–1544, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. W. F. Johnston, M. Salmon, G. Su, G. Lu, G. Ailawadi, and G. R. Upchurch Jr., “Aromatase is required for female abdominal aortic aneurysm protection,” Journal of Vascular Surgery, vol. 61, no. 6, pp. 1565–1574.e4, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. J. Ren, S. Meng, B. Yan, J. Yu, and J. Liu, “Protectin D1 reduces concanavalin A-induced liver injury by inhibiting NF-κB-mediated CX3CL1/CX3CR1 axis and NLR family, pyrin domain containing 3 inflammasome activation,” Molecular Medicine Reports, vol. 13, no. 4, pp. 3627–3638, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. J. Zhang, W. Yang, B. Hu, W. Wu, and M. B. Fallon, “Endothelin-1 activation of the endothelin B receptor modulates pulmonary endothelial CX3CL1 and contributes to pulmonary angiogenesis in experimental hepatopulmonary syndrome,” American Journal of Pathology, vol. 184, no. 6, pp. 1706–1714, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. Y. Li, L. Mao, Y. Gao, S. Baral, Y. Zhou, and B. Hu, “MicroRNA-107 contributes to post-stroke angiogenesis by targeting Dicer-1,” Scientific Reports, vol. 5, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. A. Zampetaki, R. Attia, U. Mayr et al., “Role of miR-195 in aortic aneurysmal disease,” Circulation Research, vol. 115, no. 10, pp. 857–866, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. P. C. C. Liu, X. Liu, Y. Li et al., “Identification of ADAM10 as a major source of HER2 ectodomain sheddase activity in HER2 overexpressing breast cancer cells,” Cancer Biology and Therapy, vol. 5, no. 6, pp. 657–664, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. D. R. Edwards, M. M. Handsley, and C. J. Pennington, “The ADAM metalloproteinases,” Molecular Aspects of Medicine, vol. 29, no. 5, pp. 258–289, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. N. Erin, T. İpekçi, B. Akkaya, İ. H. Özbudak, and M. Baykara, “Changes in expressions of ADAM9, 10, and 17 as well as α-secretase activity in renal cell carcinoma,” Urologic Oncology: Seminars and Original Investigations, vol. 35, no. 1, pp. 36.e15–36.e22, 2017. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  27. M. Ruff, A. Leyme, F. Le Cann et al., “The Disintegrin and Metalloprotease ADAM12 is associated with TGF-β-induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition,” PLoS ONE, vol. 10, no. 9, Article ID e0139179, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. B. Ma, Q. Ma, C. H. Jin, X. H. Wang, and G. L. Zhang, “ADAM12 expression predicts clinical outcome in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer,” International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Pathology, vol. 8, no. 10, pp. 13279–13283, 2015. View at Google Scholar
  29. T. Kauttu, H. Mustonen, S. Vainionpää et al., “Disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs) expression in gastroesophageal reflux disease and in esophageal adenocarcinoma,” Clinical and Translational Oncology, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 58–66, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. Z. Li, Y. Wang, L. Kong, Z. Yue, Y. Ma, and X. Chen, “Expression of ADAM12 is regulated by E2F1 in small cell lung cancer,” Oncology Reports, vol. 34, no. 6, pp. 3231–3237, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. B. Ma, H.-Y. Zhang, X. Bai et al., “ADAM10 mediates the cell invasion and metastasis of human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma via regulation of E-cadherin activity,” Oncology Reports, vol. 35, no. 5, pp. 2785–2794, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. J. Guo, L. He, P. Yuan et al., “ADAM10 overexpression in human non-small cell lung cancer correlates with cell migration and invasion through the activation of the Notch1 signaling pathway,” Oncology Reports, vol. 28, no. 5, pp. 1709–1718, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. R. Caltabiano, L. Puzzo, V. Barresi et al., “ADAM 10 expression in primary uveal melanoma as prognostic factor for risk of metastasis,” Pathology—Research and Practice, vol. 212, no. 11, pp. 980–987, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  34. S. Oh, A. Stark, and J. Reichrath, “The disintegrin-metalloproteinases ADAM10 and ADAM17 are upregulated in cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas,” Dermato-Endocrinology, vol. 8, no. 1, p. e1228499, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  35. E. J. Siney, A. Holden, E. Casselden, H. Bulstrode, G. J. Thomas, and S. Willaime-Morawek, “Metalloproteinases ADAM10 and ADAM17 mediate migration and differentiation in glioblastoma sphere-forming cells,” Molecular Neurobiology, pp. 1–13, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. Y. Tokumasu, A. Iida, Z. Wang, S. Ansai, M. Kinoshita, and A. Sehara-Fujisawa, “ADAM12-deficient zebrafish exhibit retardation in body growth at the juvenile stage without developmental defects,” Development Growth and Differentiation, vol. 58, no. 4, pp. 409–421, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. Z. B. Hu, Y. Chen, Y. X. Gong et al., “Activation of the CXCL16/CXCR6 pathway by inflammation contributes to atherosclerosis in patients with end-stage renal disease,” International Journal of Medical Sciences, vol. 13, no. 11, pp. 858–867, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  38. J. Wang, B. Voellger, J. Benzel et al., “Metalloproteinases ADAM12 and MMP-14 are associated with cavernous sinus invasion in pituitary adenomas,” International Journal of Cancer, vol. 139, no. 6, pp. 1327–1339, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. P. Cipriani, P. Di Benedetto, P. Ruscitti et al., “Perivascular cells in diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis overexpress activated ADAM12 and are involved in myofibroblast transdifferentiation and development of fibrosis,” Journal of Rheumatology, vol. 43, no. 7, pp. 1340–1349, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  40. S. A. O'Sullivan, F. Gasparini, A. K. Mir, and K. K. Dev, “Fractalkine shedding is mediated by p38 and the ADAM10 protease under pro-inflammatory conditions in human astrocytes,” Journal of Neuroinflammation, vol. 13, no. 1, article 189, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  41. A. Ludwig, C. Hundhausen, M. H. Lambert et al., “Metalloproteinase inhibitors for the disintegrin-like metalloproteinases ADAM10 and ADAM17 that differentially block constitutive and phorbol ester-inducible shedding of cell surface molecules,” Combinatorial Chemistry and High Throughput Screening, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 161–171, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. N. Schumacher, D. Meyer, A. Mauermann et al., “Shedding of endogenous interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R) is governed by a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) proteases while a full-length IL-6R isoform localizes to circulating microvesicles,” Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 290, no. 43, pp. 26059–26071, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  43. N. Speck, C. Brandsch, N. Schmidt et al., “The antiatherogenic effect of fish oil in male mice is associated with a diminished release of endothelial ADAM17 and ADAM10 substrates,” The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 145, no. 6, pp. 1218–1226, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  44. S. Flemming, N. Burkard, M. Renschler et al., “Soluble VE-cadherin is involved in endothelial barrier breakdown in systemic inflammation and sepsis,” Cardiovascular Research, vol. 107, no. 1, pp. 32–44, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  45. D. Dreymueller, J. Pruessmeyer, E. Groth, and A. Ludwig, “The role of ADAM-mediated shedding in vascular biology,” European Journal of Cell Biology, vol. 91, no. 6-7, pp. 472–485, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  46. L. Cui, Y. Gao, Y. Xie et al., “An ADAM10 promoter polymorphism is a functional variant in severe sepsis patients and confers susceptibility to the development of sepsis,” Critical Care, vol. 19, no. 1, article 73, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  47. S. A. Jones, S. Horiuchi, N. Topley, N. Yamamoto, and G. M. Fuller, “The soluble interleukin 6 receptor: mechanisms of production and implications in disease,” FASEB Journal, vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 43–58, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  48. P. Jing, N. Sa, X. Liu, X. Liu, and W. Xu, “MicroR-140-5p suppresses tumor cell migration and invasion by targeting ADAM10-mediated Notch1 signaling pathway in hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma,” Experimental and Molecular Pathology, vol. 100, no. 1, pp. 132–138, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  49. C. Cheng, W. Li, Z. Zhang et al., “MicroRNA-144 is regulated by activator protein-1 (AP-1) and decreases expression of alzheimer disease-related a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10),” Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 288, no. 19, pp. 13748–13761, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  50. G. Swaminathan, F. Rossi, L.-J. Sierra, A. Gupta, S. Navas-Martín, and J. Martín-García, “A role for microRNA-155 modulation in the anti-HIV-1 effects of toll-like receptor 3 stimulation in macrophages,” PLoS Pathogens, vol. 8, no. 9, Article ID e1002937, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  51. P. Vodicka, B. Pardini, V. Vymetalkova, and A. Naccarati, “Polymorphisms in non-coding RNA genes and their targets sites as risk factors of sporadic colorectal cancer,” in Non-coding RNAs in Colorectal Cancer, vol. 937 of Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, pp. 123–149, Springer International Publishing, Cham, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  52. J. Kim, G. H. Choi, K. H. Ko et al., “Association of the single nucleotide polymorphisms in microRNAs 130b, 200b, and 495 with ischemic stroke susceptibility and post-stroke mortality,” PLOS ONE, vol. 11, no. 9, Article ID e0162519, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  53. E. A. Toraih, M. S. Fawz, M. G. Elgazzaz, M. H. Hussein, R. H. Shehata, and H. G. Daoud, “Combined genotype analyses of precursor miRNA196a2 and 499a variants with hepatic andrenal cancer susceptibility a preliminary study,” Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention, vol. 17, no. 7, pp. 3369–3375, 2016. View at Google Scholar