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BioMed Research International
Volume 2018, Article ID 1042038, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/1042038
Research Article

Feasibility of Computational Fluid Dynamics for Evaluating the Intraventricular Hemodynamics in Single Right Ventricle Based on Echocardiographic Images

1Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Shanghai Children’s Medical Center, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200127, China
2Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Shanghai Children’s Medical Center, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200127, China
3Institute of Pediatric Translational Medicine, Shanghai Children’s Medical Center, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200127, China
4Department of Medical Imaging, Shanghai Children’s Medical Center, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200127, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Yu-Qi Zhang; moc.361@2186iquygnahz

Received 16 August 2017; Revised 6 December 2017; Accepted 11 December 2017; Published 16 January 2018

Academic Editor: Hwa-Liang Leo

Copyright © 2018 Li-Jun Chen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

This study introduced a combined computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and echocardiography methodology to simulate blood flow in the single right ventricle (SRV) and normal ventricles to study the intraventricular flow. Derived from echocardiographic image loops, CFD-based three-dimensional (3D) flow models of normal subject’s left ventricle (LV) and right ventricle (RV) and SRV with and without heart failure at three characteristic diastolic statuses were reconstructed. The CFD derived morphological and functional measurements in normal ventricles and the SRV were validated with echocardiography. The vortex in the normal ventricles and the SRV were studied. The morphological and functional measurements derived from CFD modeling and echocardiography were comparable, and both methods demonstrated the larger volume and higher spherical index in the SRV, in particular the SRV with heart failure. All the vortices in the SRV were smaller than those in the normal control subject’s LV and RV, notably with heart failure. Unlike normal LV and RV, no vortex ring was observed in the SRV. Echocardiography-based CFD demonstrated the feasibility of quantifying ventricular morphology and function; in addition, CFD can detect the abnormal flow pattern (smaller or obliterated vortices) in the SRV when compared with normal ventricles.