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BioMed Research International
Volume 2018, Article ID 1573871, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/1573871
Review Article

Zone of Polarizing Activity Regulatory Sequence Mutations/Duplications with Preaxial Polydactyly and Longitudinal Preaxial Ray Deficiency in the Phenotype: A Review of Human Cases, Animal Models, and Insights Regarding the Pathogenesis

King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence should be addressed to Mohammad M. Al-Qattan; moc.liamtoh@nattaqom

Received 9 October 2017; Revised 19 December 2017; Accepted 16 January 2018; Published 13 February 2018

Academic Editor: Thomas Lufkin

Copyright © 2018 Mohammad M. Al-Qattan. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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